New steroid act

All of these factors, combined with the media frenzy concerning the use of anabolic steroids by baseball players (Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire, Jose Canseco, Jason Giambi, Sammy Sosa, Roger Clemens, etc.) had sparked the second major assault on anabolic steroids by congress and the United States Government. After the congressional hearings and investigations, congress then made the decision to alter and amend the Anabolic Steroid Control Act of 1990 with the newly created and restructured Anabolic Steroid Control Act of 2004. The amendments to the act included the addition of all known prohormones to the list of controlled substances under which anabolic steroids already belonged to (schedule III), as well as the designer steroids that had previously been unknown or newly developed. This resulted, of course, in the pulling of all prohormone products from supplement stores, and any posession, use, or sale of these substances would now be considered a criminal offense as well. In addition to this, in 2004, the 10 th congress then altered and changed the definition of what an anabolic steroid is (according to the Controlled Substances Act of the United States) so as to allow a much more vague and ambiguous interpretation. As such, the definition of what constitutes an anabolic steroid was changed to the following: “ The term ‘anabolic steroid’ means any drug or hormonal substance, chemically and pharmacologically related to testosterone (other than estrogens, progestins, corticosteroids and dehydroepiandrosterone).” [2]

One of the primary arguments made is that athletes who use anabolic steroids are cheating and that cheating is immoral. No one can argue, cheating is immoral and if the use of anabolic steroids is prohibited in a particular sport for whatever reason(s), then use is cheating. That is a fairly simple yet accurate observation most can agree on. However, one can easily argue, should it be considered cheating? Should a particular sport ban the use of steroids simply on the basis of them providing an athlete an advantage? Athletes in all sports do all they can to hold an advantage over the rest of the field; better training programs, better training facilities, better coaching, better diet and nutritional plans all play a role and all are accepted. It only becomes an unfair advantage when something is available to one while not another. This is not the case with anabolic steroids; anyone who wishes or chooses to use them can. They are not secret substances only available to the privileged few; in fact, anabolic steroids are fairly cheap and more readily available than they were before the Anabolic Steroid Control Acts were ever enacted. But when it comes to steroids in sports, would it not be best to allow the sporting body to decide what’s best for the sporting body?

Dear sir,
Thanks a lot. I am really inspired with your efforts to remove quite a lots of misconceptions about Homeopathy in general public. Many Leading Homeo drs are least interested in educating people about this. Many times i have asked my doctor ( one of the leading homeo dr in my city) and he says that it is out of jealousy people are spreading this propaganda. But my question is what is your effort in preventing this spread of false propaganda. Anyway i am really happy that, though you are always a busy person, but when approached- very mild, scientific tempered and matured person. May god give you more and more strength to spread homeopathy in a scientific spirit.

Steroids can have long-lasting and sometimes irreversible side effects on the body. Anabolic steroids have been linked to increased cholesterol, stroke and blood clots, urinary and bowel problems, and problems with the musculoskeletal system. Since steroids are a hormone, much like testosterone, the effects on sex characteristics can be far reaching, causing a kind of hyper-masculinity in young men. They can also cause male-pattern baldness and shrinking of the testicles. The excess of testosterone can also have feminizing effects on young men, such as breast development. (Jerry Adler, 2004)

New steroid act

new steroid act

Steroids can have long-lasting and sometimes irreversible side effects on the body. Anabolic steroids have been linked to increased cholesterol, stroke and blood clots, urinary and bowel problems, and problems with the musculoskeletal system. Since steroids are a hormone, much like testosterone, the effects on sex characteristics can be far reaching, causing a kind of hyper-masculinity in young men. They can also cause male-pattern baldness and shrinking of the testicles. The excess of testosterone can also have feminizing effects on young men, such as breast development. (Jerry Adler, 2004)

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